SANCTIO

SANCTIO

sanctio (sangk-shee-oh), n. [Latin fr. sancio ¡°to ordain, confirm, or forbid under penalty¡±] Roman law. A particular clause in a statute imposing a penalty on any violation of that statute. Pl. sanctiones (sangk-shee-oh-neez).

¡°Sanctio (legis). A clause in a statute which strengthens its efficacity by fixing a penalty for its violation, by forbidding its derogation through a later enactment, or by releasing from responsibility any one who by acting in accordance with the statute violated another law. The purpose of the sanction clause was to settle the relation between the new statute and former and future legislation. Thus the sanctio could also state that a previous statute remained fully or partially in force without being changed by the new one.¡± Adolf Berger, Encyclopedic Dictionary of Roman Law 689 (1953).


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Carl, Chinese legal translator, specializes in translating legal documents pertaining to complex business disputes.